S90.08B Dumps Questions Increase Your Chance of Success

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Passing the S90.08B certification exam can be challenging, which is why practicing with S90.08B questions can greatly increase your chances of success. SOA Certified Professional S90.08B dumps questions help you become familiar with the exam format. The S90.08B questions are designed to mimic the actual exam, which means that you'll get a feel for the types of questions you'll encounter, the difficulty level, and the time limit. All the S90.08B exam dumps questions are the latest version for you to study. Test free S90.08B exam questions below.

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1. Service A sends a message to Service B (1). After Service B writes the message contents to Database A (2), it issues a response message back to Service A (3). Service A then sends a message to Service C (4). Upon receiving this message, Service C sends a message to Service D (5), which then writes the message contents to Database B (6) and issues a response message back to Service C (7).

Service A and Service D are located in Service Inventory A. Service B and Service C are located in Service Inventory B.





You are told that In this service composition architecture, all four services are exchanging invoice-related data in an XML format. However, the services in Service Inventory A are standardized to use a different XML schema for invoice data than the services in Service Inventory B. Also, Database A can only accept data in the Comma Separated Value (CSV) format and therefore cannot accept XML-formatted data. Database B only accepts XML-formatted data. However, it is a legacy database that uses a proprietary XML schema to represent invoice data that is different from the XML schema used by services in Service Inventory A or Service Inventory B.

What steps can be taken to enable the planned data exchange between these four services?

2. Service A, Service B, and Service C are entity services, each designed to access the same shared legacy system. Service A manages order entities, Service B manages invoice entities, and Service C manages customer entities. Service A, Service B, and Service C are REST services and are frequently reused by different service compositions. The legacy system uses a proprietary file format that Services A, B, and C need to convert to and from.





You are told that compositions involving Service A, Service B, and Service C are unnecessarily complicated due to the fact that order, invoice, and customer entitles are all related to each other. For example, an order has a customer, an invoice has an order, and so on. This results In calls to multiple services to reconstruct a complete order document. You are asked to architect a solution that will simplify the composition logic by minimizing the number of services required to support simple business functions like order management or bill payment. Additionally, you are asked to reduce the amount of redundant data transformation logic that is found in Services A, B, and C.

How will you accomplish these goals?

3. Service A is a task service that is required to carry out a series of updates to a set of databases in order to complete a task. To perform the database updates. Service A must interact with three other services that each provides standardized data access capabilities.





Service A sends its first update request message to Service B (1), which then responds with a message containing either a success or failure code (2). Service A then sends its second update request message to Service C (3), which also responds with a message containing either a success or failure code (4). Finally, Service A sends a request message to Service D (5), which responds with its own message containing either a success or failure code (6).

Services B, C and D are agnostic services that are reused and shared by multiple service consumers. This has caused unacceptable performance degradation for the service consumers of Service A as it is taking too long to complete its overall task. You've been asked to enhance the service composition architecture so that Service A provides consistent and predictable runtime performance. You are furthermore notified that a new type of data will be introduced to all three databases. It is important that this data is exchanged in a standardized manner so that the data model used for the data in inter-service messages is the same.

What steps can be taken to fulfill these requirements?

4. Service Consumer A sends a message to Service A (1), which then forwards the message to Service B (2). Service B forwards the message to Service C (3), which finally forwards the message to Service D (4). However, Services A, B and C each contain logic that reads the contents of the message to determine what intermediate processing to perform and which service to forward the message to. As a result, what is shown in the diagram is only one of several possible runtime scenarios.





Currently, this service composition architecture is performing adequately, despite the number of services that can be involved in the transmission of one message. However, you are told that new logic is being added to Service A that will require it to compose one other service to retrieve new data at runtime that Service A will need access to in order to determine where to forward the message to. The involvement of the additional service will make the service composition too large and slow.

What steps can be taken to improve the service composition architecture while still accommodating the new requirements and avoiding an increase in the amount of service composition members?

5. Services A, B, and C are non-agnostic task services. Service A and Service B use the same shared state database to defer their state data at runtime.





An assessment of the three services reveals that each contains some agnostic logic that cannot be made available for reuse because it is bundled together with non-agnostic logic.

The assessment also determines that because Service A, Service B and the shared state database are each located in physically separate environments, the remote communication required for Service A and Service B to interact with the shared state database is causing an unreasonable decrease in runtime performance.

How can the application of the Orchestration pattern improve this architecture?

6. Service A is a SOAP-based Web service with a functional context dedicated to invoice-related processing. Service B is a REST-based utility service that provides generic data access to a database.

In this service composition architecture, Service Consumer A sends a SOAP message containing an invoice XML document to Service A (1). Service A then sends the invoice XML document to Service B (2), which then writes the invoice document to a database (3).





The data model used by Service Consumer A to represent the invoice document is based on XML Schema A. The service contract of Service A is designed to accept invoice documents based on XML Schema

B. The service contract for Service B is designed to accept invoice documents based on XML Schema A. The database to which Service B needs to write the invoice record only accepts entire business documents in a proprietary Comma Separated Value (CSV) format.

Due to the incompatibility of the XML schemas used by the services, the sending of the invoice document from Service Consumer A through to Service B cannot be accomplished using the services as they currently exist. Assuming that the Contract Centralization pattern is being applied and that the Logic Centralization pattern is not being applied, what steps can be taken to enable the sending of the invoice document from Service Consumer A to the database without adding logic that will increase the runtime performance requirements?


 

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